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HANDS ON CLAY II

MAY 5th – JUNE 5th

JULIE BARTHOLOMEW, ANNA CULLITON, MEIKE DAVIS, LISE EDWARDS, ROBERT LINIGEN, SUSIE McMEEKIN, SIMON REECE, LINDA SEIFFERT and CAMERON WILLIAMS 

A group exhibition showcasing a collection of masters in their field in this dynamic and thought provoking show. 

OPENING EVENT – Saturday May 7th from 2pm. Officially opened by Bernadette Mansfield

ARTISTS

JULIE BARTHOLOMEW

Honeycombing is a new project created in response to environmental issues and the declining population of bees. A series of terracotta vessel forms are inspired by the architecture of honeycombing, and the exquisite prismatic shapes created by bees in the wild. The Honeycombing series is the extension of an ongoing project titled Habitat that aims to bring greater visibility to the global decline of bee populations by building innovative and habitable clay beehives.

VIRTUAL GALLERY & ONLINE SHOP

MEIKE DAVIS

Meike’s work has evolved from carving in stone and timber, to working with clay and ceramics.
Largely figurative, Meike tends to work in the narrative expressing the human story.
Meike is a member of the Sculpture Society and has exhibited with the Sculpture Society since 1998.

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LISE EDWARDS

ButterflyMy mother was a formidable woman. Elegant,  resourceful and independent. She went through the blitz in London. She brought up 3 girls on her own.Now as she turns 90 she has gone into full time care.It has fallen to me to sort through her possessions, pack up her memories  and clear her home of 40 years before it’s sold.As I dismantle my mother’s life it feels like I’m slowly taking her apart.Removing traces of her.She is fading.Her body is frail and weak and her skin is wrinkled. Her eyes aren’t always as penetrating as they once were. Her mind is more often alert than not but she forgets the things she wants to remember. She is becoming invisible. While she is well cared for, no one asks her for advice or her opinion anymore. People talk about her while she’s there, invisible in the room. She’s old. Her life is behind her. But… inside is the spark that always drove her, the passions, dreams and desires remain. She makes plans she’ll no longer achieve. She wants to fly but her wings are well and truly broken.“Butterfly ” is a series of stylised figures depicting our aged selves. Grounded and dull but still with our wings or remnants of them. The desire to fly and the memory of an elegance and poise that used to be and the fleeting time we have to become ourselves before we disappear.

Tresesa Moores Died 12th April 2022  (1932 – 2022)

Released into a different realm to drift in meadows green, dancing now on wildflowers, once more. she will be seen….

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ROBERT LINIGEN

Using Weed Ash Glazes

Not long after the 2013 bushfires, we moved to a house on the edge of a Blue Mountains hanging swamp at Leura. It had beautiful parts but was mostly overgrown with invasive weeds. I set to slowly restoring the bush, clearing the woody weeds, drying them in piles, burning off in the winter and collecting the ash.

Wood ash has been used as a ceramic glaze material for hundreds of years. It contains the elements that the plant has taken from the soil as it has grown. The ash is a unique fingerprint of the location, the soil, the species and even which part of the plant is used. By using this my local ash I hoped to bond with this new place and make something positive from the bush pests.

I had burned mixed piles of weeds at the beginning, but later I became a weed aficionado and made separate piles of each species, so I can make a glaze with the ash of just one type of weed, kind of like a fine single malt whisky.

You have to burn a huge volume of weeds to collect a small bucket of ash, so there is usually only enough glaze to make a few pots with each small batch. Each new batch of ash is a little different, so when it runs out, it’s gone forever and I have to try something new. It can be frustrating but I think there’s a bit of a metaphor for life there.

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SUSIE McMEEKIN

This body of work has been put together during the past two years post the fire season of 2019/2020. Covid allowed me time to think and experiment.To refire my new wood fire kiln and to, for the first time, work with large shapes.For me my work is always about glaze quality but as you can see here in this collection of pots there is one unglazed pot which has a strength of shape that carries its rawness with dignity.The glazes are from the Chinese and Korean cultures but made from Australian materials in my workshop. I collect the rocks and process them to make the raw materials necessary for the composition of the glazes.

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SIMON REECE

I am primarily a vessel maker of utilitarian ceramics and I am often looking for a way to contextualise a form or texture into a vessel.

More recently I have been making large environmental sculptures. The work has become a dialogue about landscape. Landscape becoming vessels, local landscape, devolving landscape from human influence.

The work I create focuses on landscape, waste, climate and asks for reflection on human action.

Tearing, smashing, gouging, rupturing are not subtle ways to manipulate clay. It is these gesticulations that create the serendipitous and very human characteristics of my work.

Clay defines and directs my work practice. Utilising the particular clay’s characteristics or properties and exploring its’ limitations increasingly defines my work.

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LINDA SEIFFERT

Compelled by the physical and metaphysical (metaphor) language of nature – my practice explores the infinitely evolving visual expressions, of patterns and structures throughout Natures organic processes. The mystery of nature excites me, exploring the realms where physical matter is infused with the unquantifiable substance of spirit, and where spirit can breathe and pulse in the densest most inert form of matter. I aspire to embody in the hand formed, abstract organic, clay sculpture – the sense of mystery, sanctuary, diversity and dynamism that I experience as the spirit of Nature.

As an artist working primarily with clay and the ceramic process, I inherit the legacy of an artform which has held a space, telling stories of earth and culture through millennia. “The vessel”; the archetypal ceramic container, remains as important now as ever, as do the methods of creating with clay. Within and outside of the vessel there is the infinite world of potential expression in clay.

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CAMERON WILLIAMS

Cameron Williams is one of Australia’s best known ceramic artists, designing and. producing large scale ceramics for almost 30 years. Now based with his family at Bodalla. on the far south coast, Cameron spends many of his days elbow-deep in clay at his. wheel or nurturing the massive kiln in his workshop.

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POP UPS

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